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Lower Belvedere Palace | Opulent interiors, lush gardens, and captivating exhibitions

The Belvedere PalaceLower Belvedere Palace

Built in the 18th century, the Lower Belvedere Palace is a part of the palace complex, which also includes the Upper Belvedere and the gardens. Commissioned by Prince Eugene of Savoy, the Lower Belvedere was designed as a summer residence and a symbol of his wealth and power. The palace boasts an impressive facade adorned with intricate decorations and sculptures. Its interior rooms are decorated with frescoes, stuccowork, and gilded furnishings, showcasing the opulence of the era.

The Lower Belvedere Palace shows art exhibitions from all periods, including the Middle Ages. It also hosts temporary exhibitions, highlighting the works of contemporary artists from all over the world. If you love art and history, make sure to visit the Lower Belvedere Palace.

What is the Lower Belvedere Palace?

Lower Belvedere Palace Vienna

Plan your visit to Lower Belvedere Palace

Lower Belvedere Palace opening hours
Lower Belvedere Palace location
Lower Belvedere Palace opening hours

Why is the Lower Belvedere Palace Famous?

The Lower Belvedere Palace in Vienna is famous for being one of the first public museums in the world. The construction of the palace started in 1712 housing a two-story Marble Hall, Marble Gallery, and Grotesque Hall. Due to the lavish and magnificent architecture, rich history, and art collection, the palace attracts thousands of tourists every day. 

The Lower Belvedere Palace was declared a World Heritage Site. The palace is home to plenty of high-quality medieval art. The Marble Gallery showcases several statues and the Grotesque Hall is known for wall paintings.

What’s inside Lower Belvedere Palace?

The Hall of Grotesques inside Lower Belvedere Palace

The Hall of Grotesques

The 'Grotesque' was a fanciful style of decoration that was popular in Ancient Rome. The Hall of Grotesques is a giant painting, featuring flowing, quasi-floral patterns that symbolize mythology. The painter used four seasons and four elements to decorate the corners. The windowless walls show Vulcan’s Forge and the Three Graces.

The Marble Hall inside Lower Belvedere Palace

The Marble Hall

Located in the east wing of Lower Belvedere Palace, the Marble Hall is a large two-story hall made of marble and stone. The hard-earned military trophies, statues of shackled enemies, architectural illusions, and paintings reflect the interests of Prince Eugene of Savoy.

The Marble Gallery (Marmor Gallerie)  inside Lower Belvedere Palace

The Marble Gallery

Marble Gallery showcases the military victories and the vanity of Prince Eugene. The Marble Gallery has direct access to the Privy Garden, and there is a ceiling relief. The ceiling relief shows the glory of the prince with his seat at the center, his awards, and much more.

The Gold Cabinet  inside Lower Belvedere Palace

The Gold Cabinet

Originally built as a conversation room, the Golden Room was later refurbished by Maria Theresa and adorned with golden walls, giant mirrors, and grotesque paintwork. The Cabinet has been displayed since 1765. If you stand in front of the mirrors, you will see a never-ending cascade of gold and colored arches.

Lavish Interior & Architecture inside Lower Belvedere Palace

Lavish interiors

Gaze at the opulent interiors and architecture of the Lower Belvedere Palace, which was completed in 1716. Johann Lucas von Hildebrandt planned the construction of the palace and decorated it with high-quality art pieces from that era. The decorated ceilings and artwork show the original and magnificent glory of the palace.

The Orangery inside Lower Belvedere Palace

The Orangery

The Orangery was a heated conservatory for citrus trees and is now home to a changing selection of special art exhibitions. The trees were transferred to the Pomeranzenhaus at Schonbrunn Palace after the death of Prince Eugene. The Orangery was converted into stables in 1805, and after 1918, this building houses the Museum of Medieval Art.

Architecture of the Lower Belvedere Palace

Lower Belvedere Palace architecture



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Upper or Lower Belvedere Palace Direct Entry Tickets
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Combo (Save 14%): Direct Entry to the Upper Belvedere Palace + Big Bus 24/48-Hour Hop-On Hop-Off Tour of Vienna
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Combo: Direct Entry Tickets to Belvedere Palace + Belvedere 21: Museum of Contemporary Art
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Frequently asked questions about Lower Belvedere Palace

What is Lower Belvedere Palace?

The Lower Belvedere Palace is a part of the Belvedere Palace complex. It is known for its Baroque architecture and showcases Austrian artworks from the 19th and 20th centuries.

Do I need tickets to visit Lower Belvedere Palace?

Yes, you need to book Belvedere Palace tickets to enter the Lower Belvedere Palace. We recommend booking tickets online to save time and money and ensure a hassle-free experience.

Can I purchase tickets to the Lower Belvedere Palace online?

Yes, you can purchase Belvedere Palace tickets online. Online ticket bookings are more convenient and also save time and money. You can also chance upon combo deals and reduced prices when booking tickets online.

Where is the Lower Belvedere Palace located?

The Lower Belvedere Palace is situated at Rennweg 6, 1030 in Vienna, Austria.

What are the Lower Belvedere Palace timings?

The Lower Belvedere Palace is open from 10 AM to 6 PM from Monday to Sunday throughout the year.

What is the best time to visit the Lower Belvedere Palace?

The best time to visit the Lower Belvedere Palace is between April to June or September to October. The temperatures are pleasant, making it ideal to roam around the palace grounds. Try to reach the palace grounds early in the day, around 10 AM, or visit around late afternoon, around 3 PM for lesser crowds.

Why is the Lower Belvedere Palace important?

The Lower Belvedere Palace functioned as the summer residence of Prince Eugene of Savoy. It showcases the military achievements and artistic passions of the Austrian royal family. The Belvedere Palace now houses iconic masterpieces, spanning the Middle Ages to the 20th century. While the Upper Belvedere mostly houses medieval art, the Lower Belvedere focuses on contemporary art and hosts special temporary exhibitions.

How old is the Lower Belvedere Palace?

The Lower Belvedere Palace in Vienna is 308 years old as the palace was built in the year 1714. Its architecture and artworks reflect the grandeur and opulence of the Baroque and Grotesque era.

How popular is the Lower Belvedere Palace?

With a wide range of iconic artworks, temporary exhibitions, and Baroque architectural elements, the Lower Belvedere Palace attracts thousands of tourists every year. It was originally built to function as the summer residence of Prince Eugene of Savoy.

What can you see inside the Lower Belvedere Palace?

Yes, you can purchase Belvedere Palace tickets to admire the interior of the Lower Belvedere, which is also a part of the palace complex. The Marble Hall, Marble Gallery, Hall of Grotesques, the Gold Cabinet, and the Orangery are some of the highlights of the Lower Belvedere Palace.

How many artworks are on display at the Lower Belvedere Palace in Vienna?

There are almost 18,600 artworks on display covering 900 years of art history from the 19th and 20th centuries in Lower Belvedere Palace. It also hosts special temporary exhibitions, highlighting the works of contemporary artists from all over the globe.